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About "The Bodybuilding Foods"

Some Bodybuilder Recipe Favorites

A Look At The GI Index For Common Foods


Bulk-Up Diet !

Protein (g) Carbs (g) Fat (g) Calories (g)
7:00AM  5 eggs or = in 
     egg whites 30 5 22.5 350
1 packet oatmeal 4 33 2 160
4 oz. milk 4 5.5 0 40
Meal Total: 38 43.5 24.5 550
"Show-Tech" (2 Power Capsules)
9:30AM 2 scoops protein 42 8 4 240
8 oz. milk 8 11 0 80
Meal Total: 50 19 4 320
12:00PM 1/2 lb. 90% beef 42 0 38 530
2 tortillas 6 42 7 260
1 cup rice 4 44 0.5 190
Meal Total: 52 86 45.5 980
3:30PM 2 scoops protein 42 8 4 240
8 oz. milk 8 11 0 80
Meal Total: 50 19 4 320
6:15PM 2 scoops protein 42 8 4 240
8 oz. milk 8 11 0 80
Meal Total: 50 19 4 320
7:30PM 1/2 lb. 90% beef 42 0 38 530
2 tortillas 6 42 7 260
1 cup rice 4 44 0.5 190
Meal Total: 52 86 45.5 980
10:00PM 8 oz. yogurt 11 46 2 240
----------- ----------- ----------- ------------
    DAILY TOTAL: 303 318.5 129.5 3710

 

Cutting Diet

Protein (g) Carbs (g) Fat (g) Calories (g)
7:00AM 5 eggs or = in 
     egg whites 30 5 22.5 350
1 packet oatmeal 4 33 2 160
4 oz. milk 4 5.5 0 40
Meal Total: 38 43.5 24.5 550
"Show-Tech" (2 Power Capsules)
9:30AM 2 servings protein 42 8 4 240
8 oz. milk 8 11 0 80
Meal Total: 50 19 4 320
12:00PM 2 chicken breasts 48 0 3 220
1 cup rice 4 44 0.5 190
Meal Total: 52 44 3.5 410
3:30PM 2 servings protein 42 8 4 240
8 oz. milk 8 11 0 80
Meal Total: 50 19 4 320
6:15PM 2 servings protein 42 8 4 240
8 oz. milk 8 11 0 80
Meal Total: 50 19 4 320
7:30PM 2 chicken breasts 48 0 3 220
1 cup rice 4 44 0.5 190
Meal Total: 52 44 3.5 410
10:00PM 1 serving protein 21 4 2 120
8 oz. milk 8 11 0 80
Meal Total: 29 15 2 200
---------- ---------- ---------- ------------
DAILY TOTAL: 321 203.5 45.5 2530



The Get-Big Diet for Bodybuilders
Courtesy And Special Thanks To Thomas Incledon


Not too long ago, an article in one of the local bodybuilding newspapers (you know, those cheap magazines put out by lowlifes who sell overpriced, crappy supplements and then write about how well they work) discussed the dietary strategies of a local bodybuilder. Normally, I glance right over this stuff and turn to the pictures of the fitness models. As I was about to flip the page, the number 1,200—smack dab in the middle of the article—caught my eye and made me linger a bit longer. Now get this, 1,200 was the number of grams of protein that our local "hero" was eating per day! "I feel myself get smaller if I eat less protein," he claimed.

Realizing that only a true genius could come up with this, I had to read the rest of the article. I laughed so hard as I discovered that the guy weighed only about 240 pounds and wasn't even that lean. My dream is to meet this guy so that we can run some tests and assess his kidney function. Then we'd know (at least, in his case) if high-protein diets can harm the kidneys.

If you think that our genius hero speaks the gospel, hold off before you raise any golden idols, because I'm about to take you to the Promised Land. You don't need that much protein to build muscle, my son. Become a believer of the true, Get-Big Bible and you'll be on your way to getting Samson-sized in a hurry.




Energy Needs
If you want to get bigger (and that means lean muscle, not just weight), then you have to eat more calories than you expend. Gee, what a revelation, right? You'd think that was common knowledge, but one of the most common mistakes people make when trying to gain weight is consuming an inconsistent number of calories. They claim to eat "all of the time," but their fast metabolism somehow keeps them from gaining any weight.

Checking through many of their food intake records, one can see that they eat 4,500 calories one day and 1,500 the next. When you average it out over a week, it's obvious that they're just consuming enough calories to maintain their current weight.

There are many ways to calculate how many calories you need each day. A simple method is to multiply your weight in pounds by 16. So a 200-pound guy would need:

16 x 200 = 3,200 calories per day

If he's trying to gain weight, add an additional 20% to the above calculation:

3,200 calories x 0.20 = 640 more calories per day

Adding 3,200 and 640 tells you how many calories (3,840) this guy should eat per day to gain weight. (Of course, your activity level determines whether these numbers need to be adjusted up or down.) You should strive to gain half a pound to one pound each week—more than that, and you're putting on too much fat weight.


Protein Needs for Guys Not on Drugs
Notice that this section specifies "guys not on drugs." People make the mistake of following a diet that Mr. Famous Bodybuilder uses under the false assumption that it'll work for them, as well. A guy who isn't taking steroids, growth hormone, or whatever other growth-promoting agent that's hot this week has very different protein needs than the same guy taking all of these agents. They are totally different situations and must be addressed separately.

Research studies on male subjects who lifted weights and didn't take any drugs clearly showed that men need more than the RDA of 0.8 grams of protein per kilogram of bodyweight (0.8 g/kg).(1,2) In one study using novice bodybuilders, 1.35 g/kg (or 0.61 grams of protein per pound of bodyweight) was just as good as 2.62 g/kg.(1) In another study, it was found that strength-trained men need more protein than their sedentary counterparts.(2) These particular researchers recommended 1.76 g/kg per day (0.8 g/pound per day) for strength-trained men.

Still, using our 200-pound guy for an example, strict use of the research means that he should take in 160 grams of protein per day. Some guys may decide that they want to take more protein because they don't want to bother with the math and will use one gram of protein per pound. I don't see a problem with this, other than the fact that it's not necessary.

Some people will assert that an excess of this magnitude will damage the kidneys of healthy humans, but there isn't much evidence to support this. In fact, research on obese people indicates that protein intake can alter kidney size but doesn't adversely affect kidney function.(3) This study, however, only investigated intakes up to 108 grams per day. It would be nice to see research done on renal function at protein intakes closer to what people are actually eating.